Patience

Before we have an effective vaccine, the sooner we do what it takes to prevent the Covid-19 virus from spreading, the sooner we can fill the seats of performance and sports venues, restaurants and personal grooming facilities, open more businesses and get back to work.    

Until then, in addition to wearing face coverings, practicing social distancing and washing hands, we can safeguard our mental, emotional and social health by practicing patience, bearing annoyances and difficulties without complaint, anger or irritation, and resting the mind and emotions when confronted with delays. Patience, the quality of ease under pressure, has two levels of attainment based on cause. The first is the simple choice to keep ones “cool” so not to be frustrated. Lasting and sustainable patience, however, occurs as a consequence of trust based on the deep belief that everything happens for a good reason and all is well.

When we dwell in the now, unattached to outcomes, irritation and blaming naturally fall away. By surrendering to what is and allowing life to unfold without concern to what will be, we take our foot off the gas peddle and watch as reality unfolds. By aligning with Source and relinquishing the pressure of time, we gain the confidence to accept circumstances that are beyond our control. And that frees us to focus on realizing our purpose and doing what we can to reach the intended goal, whether it be waiting for a computer to boot, Congress to pass a bill or being able to shake hands.

By staying in the moment and allowing what is, patience is strengthened. Resistance and controlling just make us miserable. Wisdom teachers from a variety of traditions agree: The journey is more important than reaching the destination. 

  

I have just three things to teach: simplicity, patience, and compassion. These three are your greatest treasures.

Lao Tzu

_____________________________

I welcome your comments at <smithdl@fuse.net>

My portfolio site: DavidLSmithPhotography.com

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